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A slave named Jessie Frazier is buried in the Frazier cemetery. He was more than just a slave—he and William Augustus Frazier were friends. In their later years, the two old men would sit on the porch of Frog Level, swat flies, swap lies, and dip snuff—or so the family stories go. The slaves on the Frazier plantation were well treated and very loyal. 

During the Civil War, marauding bands of Yankees looted and ransacked many plantations. Frog Level suffered such an attack. The slaves took all the family valuables, including money, and buried it in the fields until the Yankees left.

William Augustus Frazier was Protestant, not Catholic, even though he was from Ireland. And he brought many of the English Protestant traditions with him. One such tradition was the Yule log. Slaves would begin in the spring scouting the biggest tree they could find and fell to cure it for Christmas. Starting in December, as long as a fire could be continued from the Yule log, there was none but essential work on the plantation. A holiday for all, as long as the log could be kept afire.

Chuck Frazier
Colorado Springs, CO


My great-great grandfather, William Augustus Frazier, built this plantation. He was born in 1805. He married Sarah Pullig in 1832 in Aiken, South Carolina. They came to Arkansas in 1850 to build the plantation. My great-grandfather, Joel Lee Frazier, was born March 24, 1850, and grew up on the plantation. His mother died in 1862, during the Civil War. He got the plantation and raised his family there after the war. My grandfather was James P. Frazier. When he left home, he got 100 acres of land, $100, and a mule. He built his house down the road from Froggy Level. He had seven children—my father was the youngest. Joel was called Pappy and was a delightful man. The Civil War ruined William Frazier; he was a wealthy and educated man, but my grandfather could not read or write.


Chuck Frazier
Colorado Springs, CO