Print Page     Email Page     Increase Font SizeDecrease Font SizeReset Font Size
Skip Navigation Links

Home / Browse / Category / Government and Politics / Political Issues and Controversies / Arkansas Freedom of Information Act

Arkansas Freedom of Information Act
aka: Freedom of Information Act
aka: FOIA

The Arkansas Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), signed into law by Governor Winthrop Rockefeller on February 14, 1967, is generally considered one of the strongest and best models for open government by investigative reporters and others who research public records for various purposes. The intent of the FOIA is to keep government business and government records open and accessible to the people of Arkansas. The Arkansas FOIA has been called “the people’s law” in that it provides the citizens of Arkansas open access to the conduct of the public’s business at every level of government, as well as ready access to public records on file with a host of custodians for those records in county courthouses, city halls, public schools, and other public facilities across the state.

The passage of the Arkansas FOIA did not come without a legislative struggle. At that time in Arkansas’s history, the bulk of the political power in Arkansas was held in the hands of a few. That included local political machines from the municipal level up to and including government at the state level. State senator Ben Allen, a Little Rock (Pulaski County) attorney, and state Representative Leon Holsted, a North Little Rock (Pulaski County) druggist, both legislative leaders at the time, were the lead sponsors on the original bill. Shortly after Gov. Rockefeller signed the bill into law, the FOIA was tested in court in a lawsuit that went all the way to the Arkansas Supreme Court, where the justices ruled unanimously in favor of preserving the Arkansas FOIA. The bulk of the opposition to the passage of the law, and those initiating early court challenges to the law, were those desiring to preserve the status quo of doing the public’s business behind closed doors and out of view of the taxpaying public. In contrast to this was the Arkansas Supreme Court’s opinion, written by then associate justice George Rose Smith, which read: “It is vital in a democratic society that public business be performed in an open and public manner. We have no hesitation in asserting our conviction that the Freedom of Information Act was passed wholly in the public interest and is to be liberally interpreted to the end that its praiseworthy purposes may be achieved.” When Gov. Rockefeller left office in 1971 he pointed to the passage of the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act as one of the crowning achievements of his administration.

Initially called Act 93 of 1967, the “Arkansas Freedom of Information Act of 1967” is codified as Arkansas Code Annotated 25-19-101-109 et seq. It is brief, but its plain language leaves little room for interpretation. When interpretation has been needed, the courts of Arkansas have generally favored openness of government and government records.

The FOIA provides guidelines on what constitutes a public meeting and provides requirements for notifications when regular or special meetings of public governing bodies are scheduled. Under the law, a meeting is defined as a gathering of any bureau, commission, or agency of the state, including municipalities, supported wholly or in part by public funds or that are expending public funds. The FOIA also establishes what qualifies as a public record and provides guidelines for public access to those records. Violators of the law may be found guilty of a Class C misdemeanor, with a maximum penalty of a $100 fine and thirty days in jail.

The Arkansas FOIA continues to be updated to accommodate changes in technology that allow electronic access to public records, including court records. While none of this was necessary at the time of the passage of the FOIA, technology has significantly changed the way Arkansans and others do business, including the conduct of research through access to public records.

Since being signed into law, the Arkansas FOIA has been amended several times and, as of 2010, lists eighteen exemptions to the original law. These exemptions, created by the Arkansas legislature, amend the law to specifically protect such things as grand jury minutes, adoption records, and the identity of law enforcement officers currently working undercover, along with other protections. The Office of the Arkansas Attorney General and the Arkansas Press Association jointly publish a handbook on the Arkansas FOIA.

For additional information:
Arkansas Attorney General. http://ag.arkansas.gov/index.html (accessed January 7, 2010).

Arkansas Freedom of Information Handbook. 14th ed. Little Rock: Arkansas Press Association, 2009.

“Information Bill Gets No ‘No’s’ in House Vote.” Arkansas Gazette. February 3, 1967, p. 2A.

“Senate Sends Open Meeting Bill to WR.” Arkansas Gazette. February 14, 1957, p. 10A. 

Watkins, John J., and Richard J. Peltz. Arkansas Freedom of Information Act. 5thed. Fayetteville, AR: M&M Press, 2010.

 

Tom Larimer
Arkansas Press Association

Last Updated 10/28/2013

About this Entry: Contact the Encyclopedia / Submit a Comment / Submit a Narrative


©2014 The Central Arkansas Library System - All rights reserved - Web Services by Aristotle Web Design.